I've been getting this one a lot and I feel like I'm probably not using this opportunity well. Any suggestions for what to say?

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last year

I find that it's hard to give generic questions as the interviewer will find them a little unoriginal. In my experience, the best questions are ones that require a bit of digging into the companies history and the competitive landscape.

For example, if you were interviewing at Amazon right now for a role as a merchandiser in their Kindle department, you might ask questions like:

  1. The Kindle business has seen tremendous growth since launching in 2007. What opportunities are you all currently focused on to continue this great trajectory?
  2. I'm looking for a company where I can really set up roots, grow, and make a significant contribution. What does growth look like in this role and what can I do to ensure that I contribute to the objects of Amazon?
  3. You recently launched KU. How is that vertical doing and will my role have any contribution to its continued growth?

What I'm trying to get at is that your questions should be really thoughtful and unique to the company you're speaking with. It shows you took initiative and researched the core issues of the business.

Also, be sure to research the people you're speaking with as well. I tend to go in Incognito mode in Google Chrome and check out the Linkedin profiles of everyone I'm speaking with. If you find out that someone you're speaking with has been at the company for many years and has moved up, ask him/her how that transition has been. If you see someone just joined the company, ask him why he/she chose this new company? Asking questions like these in a casual manner allows your interviewer to speak openly about their own story and will provide insight on how he/she feels about the company, which is super valuable. Remember, you're interviewing them as well so you want to be sure the company you join is one you'll be happy with.

last year

Great comments above. The best way to impress the interviewer with the answer is stated above - research the company thoroughly and you will always find a solid question to ask that lets the interviewer know how serious you are and how well prepared. Very important. Understanding the growth curve of the company is important to you as well as being a great request for information from the interviewer. Great points made above.

last year

congrats on landing interviews, and great question. As a manager, it's a red flag when the person I'm interviewing doesn't have any questions for me.

Anyways, I found a few great posts packed with directional suggestions, but remember to tailor your question to the conversation you just had or you risk sounding scripted!

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