I have four years to figure my career out, but I want to make sure I'm setting myself up for success in the future. Am I shooting myself in the foot if I major in Philosophy? I really enjoy the subject matter, but I don't know a ton about what I can do with that major.

How much does having a specific major matter to getting a first job in a different field? Like what if I wanted to go into marketing or something? Do I have to major in marketing to get a job in marketing?

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last year

I was a Poly Sci major from UCLA and started in Sales and now Marketing for the past 8 years. Your undergrad degree matters less than your work experience, hustle, and aptitude. At undergrad you should be learning how to solve problems and break them down into manageable chunks which is similar to what you'll face in the working world every day alongside how to work with a diverse group of people. For marketing, start refining your own taste of what you think is effective or not and add on data to make it more objective.

last year

Absolutely. In many cases, your major has very little impact on your career direction. Very, very few of my peers majored in Business or Marketing or anything like that. What's most important is that you love your course of study, get amazing grades, learn how to learn, and then find a way to do side projects in marketing (summer jobs & the like) to pick up a little experience.

last year

thank you. It is a relief to hear this. What do you mean by learn how to learn? Can I ask what you majored in? I'm just curious! So cool that you work at Facebook!!!!

last year

I was a government major, with a minor in music. My peers at Facebook majored in all kinds of things, but none of them scream "marketing manager at a blue chip company." I could say the same thing about my past employers, including Google, Eventbrite, and Wells Fargo.

When I write "learn how to learn," I mean, learn how to synthesize all kinds of information to draw testable conclusions about how things work. In college, it's about putting together the readings, the lectures, the projects, and the assignments into something meaningful.

It's also especially important that you build some kind of quantitative skills. So by all means, major in philosophy, but also be sure to take courses in statistics. There is hardly a career worth having these days that don't require the ability to interpret and transform data. You certainly won't have much of a marketing career without passable quant skills.

Good luck!

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